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Looting In KenyaWe absolutely love African nations. The more corrupt, the more despicable and the more unstable the better. We already mentioned this some time ago, but it is good to remind it to our readers once in a while. We so love such African nations because they are a crystal clear example of what politicians turly are, no sugar coat and not donkey manure.

In this particular case there is an article titled "Revealed: How officials looted billions from local authorities" by the newspaper Daily Nation - Kenya which triggered our curiosity. Note, as 90 Kenyan Shilling is worth about 1 USD, we are talking about tens of millions of USD. Quite a bit of loot if one considers that cost of living in Kenya.

It would seem that at least 12 counties lost this money in terms of public lands, vehicles and other public properties just before the last General Election. A great deal of those "lost" properties mysteriously ended up in the hands of private individuals ("properly" connected) and much of the key information has been…err…let's call it "misplaced"… yeah… that sounds politically correct enough. There is a full blown audit going on from the Transition team (i.e. those who won the election) and a final report will be forthcoming next Dec, 2014 (well... perhaps). We wait with breathless anticipation the new mysteries that shall be uncovered by such a brave team because this will be the onset of a new process through which justice shall be served.

And if you believe this one, we are happy to announce that we are now a sovereign nation printing our very own fiat money with an exchange rate of 1:1 to the EUR. So, how much would you like to buy? Don't miss this incredible once-in-a-lifetime-opportunity to become filthy rich!

Now, after this short commercial intermission, we return to our scheduled presentation.

Anybody here in the room believes that the new guys (those who won the election) will be any better than the old guys (those who lost)? Raise your hand. We see… not too many raised hands. You must have been reading the subversive literature posted in F&P. Shame! Shame on you! How dare you disbelieve the sacred democratic system and their god-given vote-enabling right to loot your pockets? Shame! Shame on you!

Or maybe not.

Maybe you are just an observer of reality and you move wherever reality takes you. Maybe the problem is that African politicians have not yet find it necessary to loot with class, distinction and political correctness such as politicians in more "evolved" and "developed" countries do.

Our point is very simple. People that discard these politicians as the "exception" to the rule are sorely deluded. They are not the exception, they are the rule. The only difference is that they are obvious and overt, while other politicians are subtle and covert. All politicians must lie in order to get to their posts. We have explained this in our article Government Morality. But if they must do so because of basic democratic requirements, what else are they capable of doing? We know that their morality is not our morality. We know that the democratic system is designed to be systematically abused and as such it is. We know that the democratic system is designed to answer to the "Principle of Authority" and as such justice is always a dubious endeavour in the best of the circumstances because it also answers to the same principle.

The point is very, very simple. Politicians rob, here, there, in Kenya and everywhere else. The problem in Kenya is not that it is a banana republic; the problem is that it is a democracy.

The next point is also very, very simple. In a democracy, justice depends from laws which are subjective points of view at best. As such, they can be changed, manipulated and interpreted at will (see In-Justice In The Democratic System). A so-called "just" justice system cannot be based on the subjectivity of few applied to the lives of the rest. A "just" justice system must be based on voluntary contracts, where the subjectivity of the contractees only affects the contractees (see Justice in the Austro Libertarian System). The point is indeed very, very simple. Democratic justice is broken because it was designed from the beginning on broken principles.

This Kenyan event does nothing but expose the basic flaws of all democratic systems, although it does so with elegance and directness. Only obtuse minds (or the ones educated in public schools) can continue to insist on the idea that what happened in Kenya is not a reflection of a world-wide reality and that justice will be blind and continue on its righteous course. If you still believe in this one, we refer you to our commercial offer above.

This Kenyan event is no coincidence. This is not an "abuse of authority". This is not something unexpected. This is not something that should not have happened. This is routine and as such it is boring. This is not news for anybody else but Kenyans… and us. What is important in these news, what is critical, is the message that what happened in Kenya is happening all over the world. Today. Nobody is safe. No person is beyond it. There is a clear and present link between Kenya and the rest of the world, and this link is called democracy.

Who are you going to call? Ghostbusters? (sorry, we couldn't resist this one).

No, seriously, who are you going to call when the only place to call is the place in charge to make sure your call will never be resolved?

You can't call anybody because it is not in their best interest to dismantle the system that feeds them and keeps them in positions of privilege at your expense.

It is up to you. Entirely up to you.

But you may prefer to go with the crowd. You may prefer to believe the political fairy tales with which you were indoctrinated throughout your entire life. OK. That's most certainly your right. Just one thing, when you finally feel their hand on your throat it is going to be too late… for you anyways.

Note: please see the Glossary if you are unfamiliar with certain words.

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